Wholesale Distributors Net

Charlotte Hosiery District
Wholesale Distributors Charlotte Hosiery District

Garment Districts in U.S. Charlotte Hosiery District Wholesale Apparel and Accessories Wholesale Distributors Net

Wholesale Bulk Lots
Featured Wholesalers
Free Wholesale Listings

Wholesale Distributors Net
Wholesale Distributors
Wholesale Suppliers
Wholesale Vendors

 

 

 

Charlotte Hosiery District
Wholesale Distributors Charlotte Hosiery District

Garment Districts in U.S. Charlotte Hosiery District Wholesale Apparel and Accessories Wholesale Distributors Net

Charlotte Hosiery District Resources & News


Charlotte Hosiery District

The first cotton mill in Mecklenburg County was located in the Steele Creek community of southwestern Mecklenburg. Its owner, William Henry Neel, was a prominent citizen, having been a County Commissioners, a member of the Steele Creek.

Presbyterian Church, an officer in the local militia, and a successful cotton farmer. He operated a grist mill near what is now Withers Cove on Lake Wiley. Sometime during the 1850's, he placed some spindles in this facility and produced yarn.

The first facility in Mecklenburg County devoted exclusively to the spinning of cotton fiber was the Glenroy Cotton Mill. Founded by E. C. Grier and his son, G. S. Grier, the miss was located about half way between Matthews, N.C., and Providence Presbyterian Church, in southeastern Mecklenburg County. It contained 350 spindles and produced bale yarn. It was established in 1874 and operated for approximately eighteen months. The building was demolished in 1899.

A momentous event in the industrial development of Charlotte, N.C., occurred in 1880-1881, when R. M. Oates and his brother, D. W. Oates, established the Charlotte Cotton Mills. The facility initially contained 6,240 spindles and employed approximately seventy people, mostly women. Construction began in April 1880, and the plant went into full operation on March 8, 1881.

Built in the shape of an 'L," the Charlotte Cotton Mills fronted on West Fifth St., then near the edge of town. A substantial portion of the original edifice survives. Three cotton mills were organized and placed into production. All were erected by the D. A. Tompkins Co. This firm, co-founded by Daniel Augustus Tompkins and R. M. Miller, Sr. in 1884, included among its activities the construction and outfitting of cotton mills and cotton oil mills.

Devoted exclusively to the production of yarn, the Alpha Mill opened in February 1889. E. K. P. Osborne provided the fundamental impetus for the establishment of the mill. In 1900, a stock company headed by H. D. Wheat purchased the Alpha Mill and changed its name to the Orient Cotton Mill. In 1901, the plant was enlarged by the erection of a two-story addition. The enlarged mill remains largely unchanged.

The Ada Cotton Mill, a one-story edifice on West 11th Street, was also financed on the installment plan. John L. Brown was president of the firm, which was organized in January 1888. The plant initially contained 8,320 spindles and went into operation in early 1889. Approximately one-half of the Ada Cotton Mill survives.

The largest and most imposing of the three mills that opened in early 1889 was the Victor Cotton Mill. Located on South Cedar Street, the plant contained 10,560 spindles. G. E. Wilson was president, and A. C. Hutchinson was secretary and treasurer. The Victor departed from Charlotte's norm in that it had more than two floors. The Victor Mill has been demolished.

Highland Park Manufacturing Company Plant No. 1 (The Gingham Mill). On June 19, 1891, the Charlotte Democrat announced that the Highland Park Manufacturing Co., a firm recently organized with W. E. Holt as president and C. W. Johnson as secretary and treasurer, would erect a Gingham Mill in Charlotte.

Construction began soon thereafter, and the facility opened in early 1892. The plant, situated on North Brevard Street, then just outside of Charlotte, contained 465 looms and produced gingham. A portion of the mill survives.